Category : Anterior Crucial Ligament

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Correct Diagnosis is Important for Treatment of Cranial Cruciate Injuries

Correct Diagnosis is Important for Treatment of Cranial Cruciate Injuries By Dr. Ed Mapes Stonebridge Animal Hospital McKinney,Tx Damaged cranial cruciate ligaments comprise a large proportion of the rear leg lameness we see in dogs. Detecting the degree to which these structures are injured is a key consideration in devising the most appropriate treatment protocol, and using the proper technique is essential in making this diagnosis. In many cases, the owners have no idea how the injury occurred; the dogs are often running and playing in the yard and are seen favoring one of the rear legs when they come Read more
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Rehabilitation Following Cranial Cruciate Ligament Surgery

By Dr. Ed Mapes Stonebridge Animal Hospital McKinney, Tx Surgical procedures treating ruptured cranial cruciate ligaments provide stabilization of the joint and decrease the rate at which arthritic changes occur. Rehabilitation of the limb is equally important in assisting the patient to a satisfactory recovery. No matter which surgical procedure is used, controlled rehab prevents post-op damage and aids in healing. It is important to understand that whenever a joint is damaged, it will never be the same again. There will be, at some time, other consequences that cause at least intermittent discomfort. The most common is the development of Read more
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Cranial Cruciate Ligament Stabilization Surgery

Cranial Cruciate Ligament Stabilization Surgery By Dr. Ed Mapes Stonebridge Animal Hospital McKinney, Tx The cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL) is the most important supportive structure in the knee joint, and is subject to the most damage and failure. There is no surgical procedure that repairs the ligament; that is not possible. There are, however, a number of surgical techniques available to stabilize the knee in lieu of a functional CrCL. Each technique has its advantages and disadvantages regarding stability, return to function, post-operative complications, consequences of failure, control of pain, and rate of arthritic development. Complete tears of the CrCL Read more
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Latest Information on Feline Bartonella

Latest Information on Feline Bartonella By Dr. Ed Mapes Stonebridge Animal Hospital McKinney, Tx I have described the Bartonella bacterial organisms previously, and discussed how they infect cats by way of flea or tick bites and lead to a number of serious illnesses in cats. A part of our keen interest in diagnosing and treating infected cats is due to the fact that they can spread the disease to humans with the potential to cause a whole range of diseases in them. Infected kittens are especially likely to spread the disease, and for that reason we recommend testing all kittens Read more
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Anterior Cruciate Ligament – the ACL

Anterior Cruciate Ligament – the ACL By Dr. Ed Mapes Stonebridge Animal Hospital McKinney, Tx Injury to the Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) is the most common cause of lameness in companion animals, and comprises the bulk of orthopedic surgeries done at our hospital. We’ve made this diagnosis in dogs ranging from toys to working breeds, and even in the rare feline case; but young, active, large breed dogs are the most commonly affected. As seen in Figure 1, the anterior cruciate pairs with the posterior cruciate ligament inside the knee joint. Together, they assist other structures to hold the tibia Read more
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Luxating Patellas as a Cause of Ruptured Anterior Cruciate Ligaments

Several important structures contribute to stability of the knee joint (see Figure 1).  The cruciate ligaments (both anterior and posterior) are central in their support of proper alignment.  The patellar tendon, which extends from a large set of muscles on the femur, proceeds over the patella and then attaches to a point on the tibia bone, and stabilizes the knee in the same direction as the anterior cruciate ligament. Figure 1 illustrates the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments and trochlear groove. The patellar tendon assists the anterior cruciate ligament in controlling abnormal motion in the joint.  Together they help keep Read more
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  • animal hospital McKinney | McKinney, Texas

Cruciate Ligament Injuries: A New Therapeutic Approach

By Dr. Ed Mapes Stonebridge Animal Hospital McKinney, TX Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) disorders are very commonly seen in our canine patients; less so in felines. The ACL combines with the Posterior Cruciate Ligament to hold the femur in proper alignment with the tibia bone within the knee joint. Many factors are involved in damage to this important structure, and all of these must be taken into account when assessing an animal and the most appropriate treatment at your animal hospital McKinney. Partial or complete tears of the ACL can happen to any dog if acute trauma occurs. This usually involves Read more